Rev. John's Jottings

29 Oct 19


Lest we forget!

November is normally the month of annual remembrance for wars past and present.  Why is remembering so important?  One reason is because mistakes of the past should not be repeated.  However, sadly, history often repeats itself and we never seem to learn.  How many wars are going on at the moment around the world?  There are at least 40 active conflicts of major proportions happening at the moment.  Will they ever end?  We may ask.

I don’t think there has ever been a period in history without a war going on somewhere.  So, it is important to find ways of justice, reconciliation and peace.  Coventry Cathedral is renowned around the world for its ministry of peace and reconciliation.  There is a Chapel in the cathedral dedicated to just that.  Envoys are sent out from time to time to places of conflict and letters are sent from the Bishop’s office to many places of suffering.  One reason perhaps why conflict prevails is because of prejudice, power struggles and a failure to put ourselves in other peoples’ shoes.  

It’s not long until Christmas when we will be remembering the message of the angels to the world, at the birth of the Christ child – ‘Peace on earth, good will to all men’.   One of the great Christmas carols written at the time during the American Civil war says this:
Yet with the woes of sin and strife, the world has suffered long;
Beneath the angel-strain have rolled two thousand years of wrong;
And man, at war with man, hears not the love-song which they bring;
O hush the noise, ye men of strife, and hear the angels sing.
Amidst the clamour of noises and voices seeking our attention in full and busy lives, may the short 2 minutes of silence of remembrance bring a moment of quiet, to listen to the voice of God and the message of the angels, ‘Peace on earth, good will to all.’

I hope you can take time to stop and be still on Remembrance Day.

Rev John

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Personal Profile
Rev. John Langlands

 It is with great pleasure that I would like to welcome you to St Laurence.  Frances, my wife, and I have received a very warm welcome ourselves, so you will not be disappointed when you visit St Laurence.  I am also the Curate of the other churches in Ansley and Arley – St John’s, St Michael’s and St Wilfrid’s.

Being in a rural and farming area in the north part of Coventry Diocese is like coming home for us.  A number of years ago I pastored a church in rural Norfolk which was mainly surrounded by arable farms with some pigs and chickens.  The strong sense of community life was something very special.  This should be particularly valued in these days when many folk live such individual, separate and often lonely lives. 

We have just had hot off the press a visiting card which I hope reflects what our church stands for: ‘You will not walk alone.  Together we are with you on life’s journey’.  Over these next weeks, months and years, I hope we can get to know you better and that you will find Frances and myself not just ‘churchy’ people but friends as well, who enjoy life and plenty of laughter!